The Watson Glaser Critical Thinking Test

Last updated 10/2020

Richard Branson noted the importance of critical thinking when he remarked:

“Critical thinking is the key to creative problem solving in business.”

Richard Branson is a British business investor, philanthropist, and author. He created the Virgin Group in the 1970s.

Today, many businesses and law firms agree with this idea and seek employees with superior critical thinking skills. To assess the critical abilities of potential employees or interns, many of these companies rely on the Watson Glaser Critical Thinking Test.

If your goal is to be a lawyer or business person or to advance your career and take on a managerial or leadership role, in all likelihood you will be asked to take a Watson and Glaser Critical Thinking Test.

Critically thinking skills can be notably improved through practice. Be the candidate that stands out from the crowd. Refine your critical thinking abilities by taking PrepTerminal’s preparatory Watson and Glaser course.



Question-MarkWhat Is The Watson Glaser Critical Thinking Test?

Originally created by Goodwin Watson and Edward Glaser, The Watson Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal Test (WGCTA) evaluates and interprets the critical thinking skills of the test taker. Critical thinking assessments are psychometric tests used for the purpose of recruitment at various levels including, professional, managerial, and graduate and are used in many sectors. However, they are most commonly seen in the legal field.

Employers use this test to measure the abilities of a candidate and to see how they understand arguments, identify assumptions, and form conclusions founded on those assumptions. Thus, the Watson Glaser Critical Thinking Test mainly assesses a candidate’s ability to think critically and analytically.


Question-MarkWhat Is Critical Thinking?

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Critical thinking may be understood as your ability to objectively analyze the facts and information presented to you and to use your reason to make a judgment. It can include evaluating various sources such as data, research discoveries, and observable occurrences.

Experienced and practiced critical thinkers can form sensible conclusions from the information they are presented with and differentiate between helpful and less helpful facts to make decisions and resolve problems.

The Watson Glaser test is used to assess this skill. At PrepTerminal we are here to help you develop a mentality that will enable you to succeed in the Watson Glaser Critical Thinking Test. Our team of experts has developed a preparatory course specifically for individuals planning to take the Watson Glaser Test.


Why is Critical Thinking Important to Potential Employers?

Critical thinking is so highly esteemed by employers, as candidates who possess this ability are often superior at decision-making and are able to form informed, accurate and objective conclusions quickly. Organizations use critical thinking assessments such as the Watson Glaser Test to screen and hire the individuals who show an aptitude for critical thinking.

Furthermore, the Watson Glaser Critical Thinking Test is viewed as a reliable predictor of work productivity and at finding candidates with the potential to become leaders, managers, and other high-ranking employees.

Employees with good critical thinking skills can generally be trusted to come to conclusions independently and to make informed decisions without the need for constant guidance. This is another reason why critical thinking skills are so highly valued in today’s industries and workplaces.


6 Benefits of PrepTermainal’s Prep Watson Glaser Course

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Learn how to think like the creators of the test require you to think.

People

Understand how to base your judgments exclusively on the information given to you in the test.

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Understand the specific rules of the test.

Behavioural_Personality

Learn how to accept statements presented to you in the test on face value.

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Practice on carefully crafted course material that covers the specific subject matter of the Watson Glaser test.

Tick

Learn how to make decisions without being influenced by your past experiences.

With these tools under your belt, you will be able to wow your potential employer by acing your critical thinking test.


What Do You Need To Do To Pass The Watson Glaser Test?

Every company that administers the assessment has its own standards. Nevertheless, a score of 75% or higher will provide you with the optimum chance of selection.

The most important thing to do before you take the Watson Glaser critical thinking assessment is to practice simulations of the actual Watson Glaser test. This will maximize your chances of passing this difficult critical thinking exam.

Candidates with good problem-solving skills and refined decision-making abilities tend to be highly-sort-after by employers. At PrepTerminal our team of experts in the field has carefully developed a preparation course to help you think like the test developers want you to think so you can bring the wow factor to your test.


The Structure of the Watson Glaser Test

The Watson Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal Test consists of 40 questions. There is a timed version and an untimed version. Those sitting the timed version have 30 minutes to finish the 40 questions.

The test is made up of 5 sections:

  1. Inferences
  2. Identification of assumptions
  3. Deductions
  4. Interpretation of information
  5. Assessment of arguments

All questions on the test have multiple-choice answers (five choices are given in the inference section and two choices are given in all the rest of the questions).

There are currently two versions of the test that are available:

  1. Watson-Glaser II forms D & E (computerized or pen & paper)
  2. Watson-Glaser III (only computerized).

The central difference between the two versions is that the Watson Glaser III uses an item bank of questions and doesn’t require a test officer.

The test can be taken offline or online, and keep in mind that no marks are taken off for choosing an incorrect answer.


QuestionWhat does the Watson Glaser Critical Thinking Test Measure?

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As noted, the Watson Glaser test measures your abilities is 5 key areas: assumptions, arguments, deductions, inferences and interpreting information. Let’s take a look at each of these question types individually.

Assumptions

When people have discussions or present arguments, there are underlying assumptions in their arguments. In the test, you will be given an initial statement. You will also be presented with various assumptions. You will be asked to decide if the assumption is evident in the initial statement.

For example, in the statement “only people earning a high salary can buy a big house”, what is being assumed is that big houses are costly because only individuals who earn a high salary can purchase one. However, what’s not being assumed is that people who are not high earners aren’t legally permitted to buy a big house.

In these question types, it is your job to choose whether an assumption has or has not been made. You will need to answer: yes or no.

Arguments

You will be given an argument, such as “Should school uniform be compulsory?” You will then be given statements that relate to this argument. You are asked to state whether the statements or responses to the argument “Should school uniform be compulsory?” create a strong or weak argument.

Arguments are deemed strong if they directly relate to the topic. For example, “Yes, many people would benefit from wearing school uniforms because school kids will be less likely to form opinions about each other based on their choice of fashion. This makes for a less judgmental school environment.” The argument given is reasonable and relates to the question.

A weak argument could be something like “No, I don’t trust people who wear baggy clothes”. This second argument has little to do with the topic of making school uniforms compulsory. When you are presented with these questions you need to think objectively about the argument being made and put aside your personal judgments and opinions.

Deductions

You will be given a few sentences of information. Another different short statement will also be presented to you, which is meant to be a conclusion that an individual has made. You will need to decide if the conclusion is logical, based on the information presented to you.

If yes, then the conclusion follows on from the information available. If no, then the conclusion does not follow on from the information given. You need to base your decision on the information given and not from your previous experience or knowledge.

Inference

You will be presented with a short scenario and then will be given possible inferences. The inferences are concise statements. You will need to assess whether these concise statements have been inferred from the passage.

You will also have to decide the likelihood of the inference. You will be asked to say if the inference is ‘true,’ ‘false,’ possibly true,’ ‘possibly false’ or ‘more information is required.’ You can only select one answer.

Interpreting information

You will be presented with a passage of information and then will be shown various statements. You will be asked to decide whether the ‘conclusion follows,’ or ‘conclusion does not follow’. You choose one of these answers depending on whether or not you think that the statement can be logically arrived at from the information provided.

Here like before you need to base your answer solely on the information given to you in the question.


Question-MarkHow Difficult is the Watson Glaser Test?

As you have seen the Watson Glaser test is very tricky. It is especially hard for individuals who are not familiar with the question types. Enrolling in PrepTerminal’s preparatory Watson Glaser course will help you become familiar with the structure, and nature of the questions featured in this notoriously difficult test. We will help you understand the specific nuanced rules of the test and how to accept the statements presented to you in the test and more.

Whether your ambition is to be a lawyer, to get a promotion to a leadership role, or to manage others, PrepTermainal is here to help you make your career goals a reality.


The Watson Glaser Critical Thinking Test

Last updated 10/2020

Richard Branson noted the importance of critical thinking when he remarked:

“Critical thinking is the key to creative problem solving in business.”

Richard Branson is a British business investor, philanthropist, and author. He created the Virgin Group in the 1970s.

Today, many businesses and law firms agree with this idea and seek employees with superior critical thinking skills. To assess the critical abilities of potential employees or interns, many of these companies rely on the Watson Glaser Critical Thinking Test.

If your goal is to be a lawyer or business person or to advance your career and take on a managerial or leadership role, in all likelihood you will be asked to take a Watson and Glaser Critical Thinking Test.

Critically thinking skills can be notably improved through practice. Be the candidate that stands out from the crowd. Refine your critical thinking abilities by taking PrepTerminal’s preparatory Watson and Glaser course.

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